Category Archives: Dominican Republic

10 Reasons to Visit Monte Cristi in the Dominican Republic

Monte Cristi is the Dominican Republic’s most northwestern province, bordering Haiti, and about 3 hours’ drive from Puerto Plata or 2 hours from Santiago. It’s uniquely located in a topography that offers clear emerald green beaches, natural swimming pools surrounded by mangroves, vibrant wildlife, uninhabited little islands (keys/cayos), and arid desert-like mountains. This more virginal […]

Prejudices Against the Dominican Accent & Anti-Dominican Sentiment

Dominican Accent Identity

Dominicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, coastal Colombians, coastal Panamanians, Argentinians, and even the Andalusian/Canarian Spaniards generally tend to omit certain syllables and letters in our Spanish accents. For example “Como tu estas?” can easily be said “Como tu ‘ta?” when we speak. We can shorten words to make our language flow smoother and faster. Similarly to […]

Hiking Pico Duarte in the Dominican Alps: Conquering the Tallest Mountain in the Caribbean

pico duarte hike

Hiking Pico Duarte in the Dominican Republic is often overlooked by tourists who visit the island and are usually more interested in the tropical country’s more conventional attractions: white sand, crystal clear beaches, coconut palm trees, and pina coladas. And while we proudly have lots of those scenes scattered throughout our coastlines, they’re just a […]

Best Places In the Dominican Republic to Visit Instead of Punta Cana

The Dominican Republic is the most popular travel destination in the Caribbean. Every year, over five million travelers from around the world arrive in the tropical island nation. Tourism is one of the most important sources of revenue for the island nation. However, this revenue is not spread out consistently around. Many foreign travelers in the […]

Why I am Dominican Abroad and Not American Abroad

What does it mean to be an American? We are a 236-year-old relatively nascent country of immigrants, influenced by cultural values from around the world. Every few decades a new wave of immigrants enter and form their own diaspora communities for a few generations until they slowly assimilate into what we call the American culture; but […]